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STEAM Electives

Elective Courses at Irving STEAM

IRVING STEAM MAGNET SCHOOL

 

Elective Course Descriptions

ALL COURSES ARE 1 YEAR LONG.

 

 

Irving Lista de Electivos y descripcion de clase.


ENGINEERING ELECTIVES


Intro. to Engineering and Robotics w/ Mr. Valdez and Design & Modeling w/ Mr. Samayoa (no prerequisite)

The objective of this class is to introduce students to the many branches of engineering and to get an understanding of what they are:  Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, and Chemical Engineering.  Next, students will learn some basic techniques and principles on how Engineers take their ideas and turn them into reality (Design Process).  Finally, students will dive deep into creating various mechanisms using VEX ROBOTICS parts and will be introduced to block coding using VR.VEX.  This is a 1 semester class, the next semester they will be put into Design and Modeling with Mr. Samayoa. (See description below)

 

The Design & Modeling engineering elective class provides an engineering curriculum for students that challenges inspires, and offers variety and flexibility. Students get rigorous and relevant experiences through activity-, project-, and problem-based learning. They use industry-leading technology to solve problems while gaining skills in communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. Students apply the design process to solve problems and understand the influence of creativity and innovation in their lives. They work in teams to solve a problem/prompt, capturing research and ideas in their engineering notebooks. Using Autodesk Inventor design software, students create a virtual image of their designs and produce a portfolio to showcase their innovative solutions. PLEASE NOTE: The class is a one-semester-long course on Design & Modeling. Students will then take Intro. to Robotics the following semester with Mr. Valdez.(See description above)

 


Advanced Robotics (Mr. Valdez & Ms. Saracino) -  Prerequisites, recommendation, and qualifying rubric required.

Students who want to go into competition robotics must take either Introduction to Engineering and Robotics or Vex IQ/Flight & Space plus must apply to get into class and be recommended by either Mr. Valdez or Ms. Saracino because of the limited amount of space.  Students will dive deeper into many different mechanisms and programming robots using C++(VexCode).  And those who choose can compete in competitions on Saturdays.  


Intro. to Vex IQ Year-long course (Ms. Saracino) - no prerequisite

This introductory class teaches the basics of design through robot builds, which are taught step by step. Students then learn how to control their robot by driving manually, through a field challenge. Students work collaboratively, in teams, to improve their communication skills. The Engineer Design Process is practiced and reinforced in each unit, teaching perseverance and critical thinking skills. As students learn to write programs for their robots, they learn to code creatively and efficiently, learning to distinguish the differences. Coding runs both the virtual robot and the robots built in the classroom. As students code for their first build, they compete, in teams, on the same challenge field. This further develops critical thinking skills and provides students with an opportunity to learn how to work under pressure and how to handle stressful situations. Students continue to expand on their coding skills, to develop autonomous codes for their robots to compete on the field for the driverless competition. As students continue to learn about how robots work, they are encouraged to rebuild their robots to become more effective at the field challenges. Vex IQ provides instructions for ten different builds, after which, students are encouraged to develop their own unique, creative designs and test them on the field. 

 

Intro. to RC Race Challenge A/Intro. to Fuel Cell Technology B (EXPLORATN SCI A/B/ Samayoa)

In the Intro. to RC Challenge/Fuel Cell Technology engineering, elective course students will be introduced to engineering concepts as exhibited in the world of automobile racing. Students are certified in three key aspects of race engineering: Problem Solving, Driving through Data, and Mechanical Systems. Students will learn how systems operate and how to organize data rather than following ‘build’ directions. Students will collaborate to build a racing team, complete with a team brand, logo, slogan, advertisement, and a corporate speech. Students will learn the forces acting on race cars and how engineers use the forces to enhance the car's performance. During the second semester,  students will learn about the emerging technology for electric power generation for stationary, mobile, and portable power applications. In this course, students will learn fuel cell technology basics and operating principles;  fuel cell performance will be briefly described from energy and thermodynamic viewpoints. Subsequently, Students will apply their knowledge of fuel cell technology and explore the principles behind the real-scale fuel cell vehicles currently being rolled out across the world to create and modify an RC fuel cell car. This course is also a prerequisite for the Adv. RC Team in which students will have the opportunity to compete with students from other schools in the Ten80 National STEM League and the Horizon Hydrogen Grand Prix.


Adv. RC Team Challenge (Mr. Samayoa) - Prerequisite Intro. to RC/Fuel Cell Technology and Teacher test/signature required 

In the Ten80 Advance Race Team Challenge elective class, students will  apply the three key aspects of race engineering: Problem Solving, Driving through Data, and Mechanical Systems (certification in these three key aspects required to be eligible for adv. course) to develop their own racing team and participate in local, state and national STEM League competitions.  Students will collaborate to build a racing team, complete with a team brand, logo, slogan, advertisement, and a corporate speech. Students will learn the forces acting on race cars and how engineers use the forces to enhance the car's performance. Advanced mechanical concepts will be introduced in order for students to receive their Adv. Driver/Pit Crew Certifications. Students will work on projects and take on roles that interest them personally and that contribute to the team’s performance. In addition, students will apply their knowledge of fuel cell technology to create, modify and race an RC fuel cell powered car. Students interested in the team must commit to some lunch and afterschool practices, as well as, participation in all local and national competitions. Students interested in the team must have successfully completed one year of Intro. to RC Challenge/Intro. to Fuel Cell Technology.  Students will have the opportunity to compete with students from other local, state, national and international schools in the Ten80 National STEM League and the Horizon Hydrogen Grand Prix. * Due to school closure: We are waiving the pre-requisite to new and incoming students who are interested the team class, if they attend the informational sesion and successfully complete certain requirements. Email Mr. Samayoa if you are interested in learning more about this opportunity: edgar.samayoa@lausd.net  


Introduction to Coding w/Code.org Ms. Ziegler - no prerequisite

This introductory computer science course empowers students to create authentic artifacts and engage with computer science as a medium for creativity, communication, problem-solving, and fun. Semester 1 - Exploration and Expression: Introduces students to computer science as a path to problem-solving, communication, and personal expression. This semester focuses on the visible aspects of computing and computer science, and encourages students to see computer science around them and how they can engage with it as a tool.Semester 2 - Innovation and Impact: Asks students to look outward and explore the impact of computer science on the end-user. Students will design an interactive game using Javascript and explore ways to make the game more engaging for the user. 

 

Introduction to Computer Science/ Mr. Valdez - no prerequisite

This introductory computer science course empowers students to create authentic artifacts and engage with computer science as a medium for creativity, communication, problem-solving, and fun. Semester 1 - Exploration and Expression: Introduces students to computer science as a path to problem-solving, communication, and personal expression. This semester focuses on the visible aspects of computing and computer science, and encourages students to see computer science around them and how they can engage with it as a tool. Semester 2 - Innovation and Impact: Asks students to look outward and explore the impact of computer science on the end-user. Students will design an interactive game using Javascript and explore ways to make the game more engaging for the user. 

 

Flight & Space (Ms. Saracino) - no prerequisite

This introductory explains the history of flight and how planes fly, by explaining the parts of a plane and how they act with the forces of flight and Newton’s Laws of Motion. Students will create paper airplanes, jet straws, and straw arrows to demonstrate these principles. The principles of engines and fuels are then explored using balloons for rocket thrusters and vinegar and baking soda in builds for examples. We explore mapping flight plans in Googlemaps terrain and discuss careers in aeronautics. 
Moving on to space, we use Googlemaps.mars to plan the landing spot for a  mission to mars. We explore what astronauts do and how they live, how they are selected and what their schedules and responsibilities are in space. We discuss current events in space and how technology is driving new career options. The class culminates with using the Engineer Design Process to create a Mars lander through a multi-week build, putting to practice all of the principles learned throughout the semester. The year concludes with students launching their mars lander and explaining their design process. 


Intro. to Game Design/Collaboration no prerequisite 
This class will include an in-depth training in one's communication and collaboration with others. Students will learn how to incorporate effective modes of communication and listening skills while simultaneously building literacy in Esports. They will also learn about the intersection of screen usage and mental and physical health.

 

 

VISUAL ART ELECTIVES 

 

Intro to Art   no prerequisite
A basic exploratory course in the fundamentals of art introducing a variety of media and techniques utilizing different types of drawing, collage, mixed media, and printmaking. Students will learn the elements and principles of design. Students perceive and learn to analyze and respond to their own art, that of a classmates and well known artists. They will gain understanding of its and historical and cultural references.

 

Advanced Art

For students who previously took art.
An advanced exploration course using the fundamentals of art that will include a wider variety of materials and techniques. Students will create a series of artworks based upon a special interest and/or theme. Students will be expected to self-reflect on their own work and also critique classmates’ pieces.

 

Graphic Design. - no prerequisite

Students will learn to use the Principles of Design as they create using Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator and Animate, as well as with non-digital media. Advanced students will be challenged to deepen their facility with design tools and principles and are welcome to take this class multiple times with all new projects each year Course curriculum is project-based and includes photo editing, vector drawing, website publishing, logos, art, cartoon characters and topical studies.  

 

Animation Prerequisite : see Description

Students will learn to use a variety of animation applications to create original animated shorts.   Students will create original vector designs and work on special school wide projects including E-Times and other digital publications.  Prerequisite : One year of

Graphic Design

 

Film Appreciation w/ Ms. Garza - no prerequisite

Movies are a fundamental part of American culture and one of our greatest forms of artistic expression. This course is designed to teach students how to analyze, discuss, and appreciate the art of storytelling through film. My objective is to teach students how to be discerning and thoughtful movie-goers by watching, talking, and writing about a diverse selection of movies. This class will emphasize the analysis and understanding of the following: basic movie genres, narrative fundamentals, theme, the style and evolution of movies and how they reflect our changing culture. By the end of the course, students should expect to know about various movie-making essentials such as directing, acting, sound, score, lighting, scriptwriting, etc. We will be watching movies across a wide spectrum of genres (types) including science fiction, suspense/horror, drama, documentary, etc. Students will be expected to be active listeners/viewers and critics. (We will not be making/producing movies; that’s Ms. Gavin’s class, but you will need to take thiscourse as a prerequisite for the production class :) (Do not sign up for this class if you already took Film in the 2020/21 school year.)


Film Production w/ Ms. Gavin (Prerequisites: see description )

The Film Production elective is perfect for students who love film, television and storytelling and want to put their passion into action, but it’s also perfect for students who don’t know anything about movie-making! By the end of the year, my goal is for students to feel empowered to tell their own stories and use their critical eye to discuss/review film and television as they continue to watch content in their own time. First Semester: students will learn the basics of film history, genre, and production. Second Semester: students will split into small production groups to practice writing, filming and editing footage in different genres such as commercial, comedy, horror and/or documentary. We will be using simple equipment such as iPads, students' own phone cameras, and iMovie to prove how easy film production can be. 


PERFORMING ARTS ELECTIVES

 

Beginning Strings: No prerequisite


The beginning strings class is for students who have no prior experience playing a string instrument. The students are given the opportunity to try the different string instruments. Through an instrument selection process that considers physical attributes, timbral preference, and aural skills, we help students find the right instrument for them. Beginning string students can learn to play the violin, viola, cello, and string bass. From instrument care and maintenance to music literacy, students learn the fundamental skills necessary to perform on their instrument. Beginning string students perform in two concerts and one recital for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium. 

 

Intermediate Strings:
The intermediate string class is for 7th and 8th grade students who have previously taken beginning strings or who audition/place into this class at the teacher’s discretion. The focus of the intermediate level class is to build upon the skills developed in beginning strings. The class will primarily use the A New Direction in Strings method book with a stronger emphasis on supplemental materials. This is to prepare the student for the advanced level course. More key centers will be introduced as well as complete scales with arpeggios and thirds added. This course will place a strong emphasis on pedagogy and ensemble playing. Intermediate string students perform in two concerts and one recital for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium. 

 

Advanced Strings:
The advanced strings class is for 7th and 8th grade students who have at least two years of experience playing their instrument or who audition/place into this class at the teacher’s discretion. ​Students in Advanced strings focus on playing and reading skills which will prepare them to play in high school orchestra, and beyond. Students are also given the opportunity to play in small groups, full orchestra, compose music and perform as soloists at our department recitals. Students are able to play in several key centers, meters, and styles. A strong emphasis is placed on supplemental materials and ensemble literature. The advanced string class regularly represents Irving at LAUSD’s instructional summit days and has participated in the LA Phil’s Symphonies for Schools program. Advanced string students perform in two concerts, two recitals for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium and other community events. 

 

Beginning Band:  No prerequisite
The beginning band class is for students who have no prior experience playing a band instrument. The students are given the opportunity to try the different woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Through an instrument selection process that considers physical attributes, timbral preference, and aural skills, we help students find the right instrument for them. Beginning Band members can learn to play the flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, tuba, and percussion instruments. From instrument care and maintenance to music literacy, students learn the fundamental skills necessary to perform on their instrument. Beginning string students perform in two concerts and one recital for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium. 

 

Intermediate Band:
Intermediate band is for 7th and 8th grade students who have previously taken beginning band  or who audition/place into this class at the teacher’s discretion. The focus of the intermediate level class is to build upon the skills developed in beginning band. The class will primarily use the Standard of Excellence method book with a stronger emphasis on supplemental materials. This is to prepare the student for the advanced level course. More key centers will be introduced as well as complete scales with arpeggios and thirds added. This course will place a strong emphasis on pedagogy and ensemble playing.  Intermediate band  students perform in two concerts and one recital for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium. 

 

Advanced Band:
The advanced band class is for 7th and 8th grade students who have at least two years of experience playing their instrument or who audition/place into this class at the teacher’s discretion. ​Students in Advanced band focus on playing and reading skills which will prepare them to play in high school orchestra, and beyond. Students are also given the opportunity to play in small groups, full orchestra, compose music and perform as soloists at our department recitals. Students are able to play in several key centers, meters, and styles. A strong emphasis is placed on supplemental materials and ensemble literature. The advanced band class regularly represents Irving at LAUSD’s instructional summit days and has participated in the LA Phil’s Symphonies for Schools program. Advanced band students perform in two concerts, two recitals for friends and family at Irving’s auditorium and other community events.  

 

Introduction to Piano/Keyboard - No prerequisite 
This course is designed for students who wish to develop basic piano playing skills or expand on their existing skills. Time in class will be spent both on and off the keyboards. While playing students will be working individually and in small groups to master techniques of playing. Students will also learn music history and theory.

 

Beginning and Intermediate Dance - No prerequisite 
Dance Styles and Technique is a one year class designed to give the student an advanced introduction to various dance styles including world traditional and urban styles such as salsa and hip hop, classical technique including jazz, modern, ballet and tap, and specialty styles such as dance fitness and conditioning, musical theatre and light tumbling. Students will also be taught basic and intermediate choreography concepts. Students will get to participate in 4 shows per year. 2 shows are usually part of the mandatory requirement. Dances covered are: traditional classical forms of dance including ballet, jazz and modern, tap, hip hop, house style, as well as swing, Latin, African, other world dance styles, conditioning and tumbling. 

 

Advanced Dance (Team) and Production Prerequisite : see below
Dance team meets on average three days per week including a number of Saturdays. I break my dancers into three performing levels and three different dance styles usually. This year we may go for four dance teams for more overall point potentials.
Dance team has three captains and three co-captains elected to the position, two drill coaches and a rehearsal manager. Captains are responsible for assisting learning of choreography, learning of routines, placements, modeling behavior, helping the team to keep focus and assist troubleshooting all items relevant to team needs (meetings for team fundraising, team gear, costumes, competition selection, communications, organizing rehearsals, schedules, skills, and team bonding exercises).
Dancers will go for 4-5 competitions for next year, 3 school day shows, 3 night shows and a number of invitational performance events. Our dance team is being recognized by our councilman Mitch O’Farrell, Dance and Dialogue, Brockus Dance Project, Versastyle and various other dance companies that want to come in and offer support for what has been built. Schools are looking to bridge with us for our talented dancers! We’re on the way up!
The production portion of the class focuses on fundraising, marketing, advertising, and building the show framework including dances for each class, costumes and resource requirements. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to participate and experience a local, state and national competitions. Placement try outs and teacher approval required. Please email Ms. Dunn connie.dunn@lausd.net for try-outs/audition information.


Dual Language Program w/ Spanish Elective

One of the District’s goals is to increase the number students who are bilingual and biliterate. The  Dual Language Education Program goal is that students reach advanced levels of academic and language proficiency in both languages and gain sociocultural understanding and competence. Students enrolled in the dual language program at Irving will take Spanish as a foreign language elective and will be enrolled in ONE Core-subject course to continue to enhance their Spanish-language skills. For more information, call us at 818-253-1690.

 

LIFE SKILLS ELECTIVES

 

Leadership

 

Must have a 3.00 GPA or higher from the final spring report card and good attendance.  The course content of the Leadership class at Irving Magnet School is based on standards designed to teach participants teambuilding, communication skills, group and peer leadership, problem-solving, time management, and assist with their personal development as leaders. Students will serve as Irving Ambassadors, participate in decision making, serve in various committees, fundraise and complete service learning hours. We will also be assisting Grapin design students with the school's yearbook. Priority will be given to 8th-grade students, but 7th graders are encouraged to apply.

 

Service

FOR 8TH GRADE ONLY. Must have a 3.00 GPA or higher from the final spring report card and good attendance.  Must have a note from the teacher or office you would like to work with, and periods they would need your assistance. Each class will be different and based on the needs of the person you are helping. You will be cleaning up, filing papers, help other students, make copies, take passes/notes, etc. Must be reliable and responsible.